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river restoration and remediation
combining tools and technology to restore balance in watersheds
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National Riparian Service Team

watershed professionals network

stream systems technology center (usfs)

USGS     USGS  EROS  
CU Geography Dept Resources

USGS Employment

Research in Small Watersheds

USGS Western Region Coastal and Marine Geology

USGS Water Resources Division

USGS Water Resources of Alaska

Water Resources of Wyoming
 fluvial geomorphology  - riverine change through time
Striving to improve knowledge of watershed hydrology, stream systems, development of riparian and geoscience technology to repair and secure favorable conditions of water flows and watersheds.

Specializing in watershed analysis and stream channel stability
Stream channel dynamics and stability
Analytical methods in fluvial geomorphology

Working to deploy skills and knowledge from the following backgrounds:

Geography and Earth Sciences
River Restoration
River Geology
River Engineering
Aerial Photo interpretation

What is fluvial?
Erosion. Sedimentation.  Fluvial processes and change through time.
These are some of the components of fluvial geomorphology.
Geomorphology is the science by which we review Earth's landscapes and landforms.
Interested more specifically in the processes by which the landforms originated, how old these landforms are, the composition of these landforms (ie: materials of their composition, and the processes in place upon and affecting these landforms.

Geomorphology can be applied readily to streams by seeking to understand the geology of rivers and their dominant landforms.
By developing stream profiles and joining together data about topography, flora and fauna, the living elements coalesce to bring the third dimension into fluvial geomorphology.

Fluvial geomorphology is highly valued in ecological restoration projects for the insight and scale provided regarding spatial and temporal perspectives in channel change and sensitivity analysis.
A fluvial geomorphologist can pull from a wide range of tools to aide in developing a better watershed profile; one minute reviewing the stratigraphic analysis of a flood plain, the next minute reviewing human influences, the next minute in review of local tectonic change and history.  
A fluvial geomorphologist is a researcher, a biologist, a geologist and a problem solver.


terminology:

eutrophic: (adjective) from Greek eutrophos well-nourished, nourishing, from eu- + trephein to nourish
of a body of water : characterized by the state resulting from eutrophication

eutrophication: (noun) the process by which a body of water becomes enriched in dissolved nutrients (as phosphates) that stimulate the growth of aquatic plant life usually resulting in the depletion of dissolved oxygen.

limnology: (noun) the scientific study of bodies of freshwater (as lakes)

lotic: (adjective) of, relating to, or living in actively moving water <ex. a lotic habitat >

lentic: (adjective) of, relating to, or living in still waters (as lakes, ponds, or swamps)

oligotrophic: (adjective) deficient in plant nutrients <oligotrophic boggy acid soils>;
especially
: having abundant dissolved oxygen <an oligotrophic body of water>

Geomorphology


and


USGS Resources
National Riparian Service Team

watershed professionals network

stream systems technology center (usfs)

USGS     USGS  EROS    CU Geography DeptResources

USGS Employment

Research in Small Watersheds

USGS Western Region Coastal and Marine Geology

USGS Water Resources Division

USGS Water Resources of Alaska

Water Resources of Wyoming


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Last Modified: March, 2005




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